Foods High in Magnesium

Over a dozen foods are high in magnesium, although few of them are eaten regularly as part of the normal diet. Vegetarians and vegans are more likely to eat foods high in magnesium than meat-eaters.

Foods high in magnesium include wheatgerm, almonds, cashew nuts, brewer's yeast, buckwheat flour, Brazil nuts, peanuts and pecan nuts. Nuts are generally a good source of minerals, so it is not surprising that they are high in the list of foods high in magnesium.

Calcium, phosphorous, zinc and vitamins B1, B6 and D all help the absorption of magnesium from foods. The large amount of calcium, which is not well absorbed, is detrimental to the absorption of magnesium. When you look for foods high in magnesium, look for those that contain calcium, but in t he right proportion. Calcium and magnesium are absorbed best when taken in a proportion of 3 parts of calcium to 2 parts of magnesium - 600 mg calcium to 400 mg magnesium, for example.

Magnesium is an important mineral, since it strengthens bones and teeth while it leads to improved muscles. Like all minerals, if taken as a supplement, it should be combined with other minerals in a multi-mineral supplement.

This is a list of foods that are high in magnesium, shown per 100 grams are:

  • Wheatgerm - 490 milligrams (mg)
  • Almonds - 270 mg
  • Cashew nuts - 267 mg
  • Brewer's yeast - 231 mg
  • Buckwheat flour - 229 mg
  • Brazil nuts - 225 mg
  • Peanuts - 175 mg
  • Pecan nuts - 142 mg
  • Cooked beans - 37 mg

Almonds, which are also a good source of calcium (234 milligrams per 100 grams) are an excellent source of nutrition, and especially for minerals. They also contain iron and zinc.

Foods high in magnesium are fairly plentiful, but care is needed to ensure that they are kept at low temperatures. Nuts and seeds, which are among foods high in magnesium, should be kept in the refrigerator to prevent them oxidizing. But wheatgerm is best among foods high in magnesium, and can be taken easily by sprinkling it on cereal at breakfast. It can also be added to dough mixtures. Calcium and magnesium go together.

Healthy Food Without Calories

Taste needn't rely on fat and sugar. You can make your nutrition healthier and your food deliciously flavorful by adding a number of low-calorie ingredients, such as any of the following:

1. Canned chiles: Add whole chiles to a grilled chicken sandwich or diced chiles to soups, scrambled eggs, pita sandwiches, or sprinkle on tortillas.

2. Dried cranberries: Great in marinades for baked chicken. Add to quick breads, spinach salads, chicken salads, and rice dishes.

3. Portobello mushrooms: Marinate and grill like hamburger, slice grilled, and add to salads or pasta dishes, or use instead of meat for sandwiches.

4. Canned roasted red yellow peppers: Add to a grilled cheese sandwich, blend them with some cayenne and drizzle over a creamed vegetable soup, egg dishes, pasta sauces (cold and hot), or add as a topping with cheese for crackers.

5. Fresh cilantro: Add to fruit- or tomato-based salsa to accompany fish or poultry. Add to curried chicken salads with celery, apples, and grapes. Add to a bean burrito, fruit or vegetable salads, vinaigrette dressings, black beans, or rice dishes.

6. Red onions: Slice thin and add to salads, sandwiches, bean dips, or egg dishes.

7. Honey: Drizzle over yogurt, warm brown rice with pistachios, or sliced apples. Sweeten mashed sweet potatoes with honey. Mix with mustard, orange juice, balsamic vinegar, and herbs as a marinade for chicken.

8. Fresh parsley: Mix with lemon and pepper and drizzle over grilled fish. Mix with minced garlic and whole wheat bread crumbs or wheat germ for a savory crust for potato dishes or chicken. Mix with olive oil and garlic for a pesto sauce for mashed potatoes.

9. Mint: Add to chopped tomatoes and cucumbers, rice dishes, and beans.

10. Sundried tomatoes: Use in pasta salads, sandwich spreads, vegetable dips, or as an extra topping on pizza. Mix into saute'ed zucchini or as an accompaniment to grilled eggplant. Blend with olives, garlic, and balsamic vinegar to make a spicy spread for grilled vegetable sandwiches.

11. Fresh ginger: Combine with curry to flavor chicken, add to hot or iced tea, use to season steamed vegetables such as pea pods or carrots. Use as a topping along with green onions on roasted fish. Add to stir fries, tofu dishes, or salad dressings.

12. Horseradish: Use in potato dishes, vegetable dips with dill, vegetable or chicken wraps with fat-free sour cream, spicy soup like gumbo, turkey burgers (ginger is good here, too), cold potato salad, or cold green beans.

13. Add grated rind (called lemon zest) to fruit salads. The juice can put a tangy taste in couscous, gazpacho, and dressings, and can be used as marinade for fish.

14. Fresh herbs: Fresh always tastes better than dried. Add fresh basil to pasta, tomatoes or other vegetables, bread dough, or even mango slices (basil and lemon are a good match). Fresh rosemary accents any meat, as well as pasta dishes, roasted vegetables, lima beans, peas, or squash. Fresh dill is an excellent flavor for fish, chicken, omelets and other egg dishes, salads, beets, cabbage, potatoes, or cucumbers. Fresh oregano is excellent in Italian, Greek, or Mexican dishes.

15. Hoisin sauce: Use as a glaze with garlic, cilantro, and ginger for chicken. Add to steamed green beans.

16. Pine nuts: Add a few to stuffings, pesto sauce, pilafs, and fillings for poultry or vegetables, such as eggplant or large zucchini.

17. Crushed red pepper flakes or Tabasco: Sprinkle on pizza, pasta dishes, salads, or soups. Add to olive oil or sour cream dips, rice dishes, or bean salads. Mix into cornbread batter or bread dough.

18. Tamarind: Add to mixed steamed vegetables, fresh orange juice, salad dressing, and sauces for fish.

19. Salsa: Make your own by experimenting with grilled corn, vine-ripened tomatoes, garlic, red onions, and chiles. Or try fruit salsa made from mango, jicama, and black beans. Try adding rice wine vinegar, fresh mint, lime juice, fresh herbs, avocado, or cilantro.

20. Sherry: Add a tablespoon to soups, sauces, marinades, or fruit glazes.

Common nutritional diseases

Have you ever thought about your diet? The majority of us eat a large variety of things without realizing what they actually are. Proper nutrition should contain contains a sufficient variety of foods. But as far as many people don’t eat properly, there is quite a number of nutritional diseases.

A few of them are caused by eating too much. But most are caused by a lack of something in the diet. One of nutritional diseases of this kind is malnutrition. It is caused by a general lack of food in the diet. Malnutrition is the result of a improper, poor nutrition. Malnutrition may cause serious ill-health and lead to much sickness.

Another is caused by eating too much food. Obesity (overweight) is widespread all over the world. An obese (overweight) person is more likely to suffer from heart disease than someone who is not overweight. Heart disease kills more people than any other disease in the developed countries of Europe and North America. Obesity is common in these countries, and causes more ill-health than all the vitamin deficiency diseases put together.

One more disease is caused by the lack of a substance called vitamin D in the diet. A lack of vitamin D causes the bones to become soft. The legs may bend under the weight of the body. This one is called rickets and belongs to the so called deficiency diseases.

Another deficiency disease is marasmus. Children with marasmus suffer from a general weakness and do not grow properly. They are more likely to suffer badly from the infectious diseases which healthy people can get over quite easily. These include coughs and colds, as well as childhood diseases such as mumps and chickenpox.

One more deficiency disease is caused by a lack of vitamin A in the diet, and can cause blindness.

Nutritional diseases may not actually kill those who have them. However, they do make their sufferers more likely to get other diseases.